Monthly Archives: February 2015

Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (Burma) & former political prisoner society

bur

Initial Findings of the Documentation Project
Executive Summary
To date, government efforts to assist former political prisoners
(FPPs) to acclimatize and reintegrate into society have been largely
nonexistent in Burma. The effects of this inaction have, and continue
to be hugely detrimental for the FPPs, their families, and for
transitional justice efforts in the country. This inaction has become
even more pressing since the government of Burma began releasing
hundreds of political prisoners1 in a wave of amnesties following the
2011 political reforms.
There are between 7,000 and 10,000 former political prisoners residing
inside Burma, however very little is known regarding their current
economic and social status, nor is there comprehensive data concerning
their experiences inside the prison system. From March 2014 to date,
the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP)’s
Documentation Project, with the support of the Former Political
Prisoners Society (FPPS), has been implementing an ongoing and vast
data collection process both inside Burma and along the Thai-Burma
border. The data collection aims to address three purposes: to collect
census data of the FPPs that participated in the surveying; to
understand the extent of the torture and mistreatment they faced
whilst in prison; and to conduct a thorough needs assessment of the
FPP population to provide the empirical basis for future interventions
and rehabilitation programs.
The Documentation Project seeks to conclude with the release of two
final and comprehensive publications based on the entire data
collection in the first half of 2015: on the systematic use of torture
and mistreatment of political prisoners; and on identifying needs of
former political prisoners and building the case for reparations as
key to transitional justice in Burma.
This report aims to provide an overview of the Documentation Project
to date. The first section describes the methodology of the data
collection, entry and cleaning process; the second section reveals the
initial findings of the data analysis; and the third and final section
outlines the next steps of the Documentation Project.
For more information, please contact
Bo Kyi +66 (0) 81 962 8713
Thet Oo +95 (0) 97 310 7933


Best Regard,

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Some Reflections on Comrades, The Spirit of Resistance, Struggle and Death” by Jaan Laaman

“Some Reflections on Comrades, The Spirit of Resistance, Struggle and Death”
by Jaan Laaman –AP_FERGUSON9_140818_DG_4x3_992
2015 is almost a month old and my overall outlook has been optimistic and energized. With a months long new movement in the streets, fighting against government repression and police killings of unarmed men, boys and women too, mostly of color, for me it has been a time of gathering information and supporting and contributing to this new movement.
It is within this context, that I just received somber and hard information about two comrades of mine, two very good human beings, steadfast brothers and courageous fighters in the Freedom Struggle. I am talking about two friends of mine, both long held political prisoners — Phil Africa and Bill Dunne.
William Phillips Africa died on January 10, 2015, in the Pennsylvania state prison system, at SCI Dallas.
Phil Africa was one of the Move 9, all of whom have been in captivity since August 8, 1978. On that day, the Philadelphia police and other government forces launched an unprovoked assault on the Move home. The Move 9 are completely innocent women and men who were thrown into prison for 30 to 100 year sentences. They are all still in prison, except for Merle Africa who died in 1998, and now Phil.
Phil Africa never stopped struggling for justice and freedom, not only for the Move Family and his co-defendants, but for poor and oppressed people of all colors, across this country and around the world. Phil was a good man, intelligent and brave, thoughtful and caring. He could make you laugh and he was self disciplined and worked to stay in shape. He was a father figure, as well as a boxing teacher and sports coach to many younger men.
Phil’s death in the Pennsylvania state correctional institution at Dallas, came under very questionable and suspicious circumstances. See a more detailed posting on Phil’s death at http://www.4strugglemag.org.
My political prisoner brother and friend, Phil Africa, died in that Pennsylvania prison cell in his 37th year of captivity. Phil’s hardships and deprivations are now over. Phil was never a man who bemoaned the harsh, inhumane and injust realities he and other prisoners were forced to endure. Dying in prison is always a sad reality. Phil’s hardships are now over and that is a good thing, even while we mourn his passing. We should also question the circumstances surrounding his death and demand answers from Pennsylvania prison officials.
Continuing in this journey of hard news and harsh realities, let me share some information on another friend and fellow political prisoner, Bill Dunne. Bill is alive and I’m pretty sure in decent health. Like other political prisoners, Bill stays fit, in fighting shape, because it doesn’t matter how old you are or how many decades you have been imprisoned, the government and its agents never cease in their efforts to defeat you, break you and stop you in your/our struggle for justice, freedom and a revolutionary future of peace, equality and protection of our planet. So Bill, like all political prisoners, try’s to keep the Spirit of Resistance firm and his body and mind fit.
Bill has been in captivity since 1979, that is for 36 years. He has been held in maximum security penitentiaries and special lock-down control units for all these years. In 2000, when he already had spent 21 years in prison, the United States parole board gave Bill a 15 year hit! That is, he was ordered to spend 15 more years in prison. Two months ago, Bill again appeared before the parole board and in a vicious act of inhumanity and hatred for the Freedom Struggle and Freedom Fighters, the U.S. parole board hit Bill with another 15 year set off! He is not eligible to see the parole board again until 2029. See http://www.4strugglemag.org, for a more detailed report on Bill Dunne’s parole hearing.
The ugly reality is that there are political prisoners, courageous and noble leaders like Sundiata Acoli and Leonard Peltier, who have been locked up even longer; Sundiata has been in captivity for 43 years, Leonard for 39 years, and there are others like them.
The parole board’s primary questions, as well as its ‘justifications’ for ordering Bill to, quite likely, spend the rest of his life in prison, was his “continuing association and affiliation with anarchist organizations”, which was, “evidence you still harbor anti-authoritarian views…”
The U.S. government, through its parole board, made very clear that Bill’s real offense, like the so called crimes of all U.S. held political prisoners, was his political beliefs and associations. The activities Bill and other political prisoners may have taken in support of liberation and justice based political views is not the main “crime” in the eyes of the United States government. The ultimate “crime” is Freedom and Justice based revolutionary thinking and beliefs. Anarchist; socialist; communist, National Liberation for Puerto Rico, the Black Nation in the usa, the Native/Indigenous Nations; the Green ecological ideology of protecting our Earth and all its life against imperialist plunder, these are the “crimes” of political prisoners.
I am certain Bill Dunne will challenge and litigate this unprecedented second 15 year hit. I am also sure Bill will continue to work with the ABC collectives and other outside groups the parole board listed; the groups they so hated and feared.
I wanted to express my complete solidarity and support for Bill in his harsh ongoing struggle for justice, life and freedom. And I wanted to convey my heartfelt solidarity and revolutionary love to all the Move Family and Phil Africa’s closest people. We will always remember and be inspired by Phil Africa.
Sharing this information and reflecting on the types of realities that all political prisoners confront and have to deal with, I hope, gives you people outside, a little more understanding of revolutionary struggle and life behind prison walls. I do have some concern that perhaps some of you activists and people of conscience, may be overly intimidated by these realities of prison life. Engaging in the Freedom Struggle always has the potential of confrontation with the state and its abusive police power. This can include being thrown into prison. People should be clear about this. You should also be clear though, that even in extreme examples, like the heroic lives and struggle of Phil Africa and Bill Dunne, imprisoned Freedom Fighters can and do maintain their principles, their dignity and their will and ability to struggle. The more that people and the media, including the non-corporate media, are aware of and supportative of political prisoners and prison struggle generally, the more protection this provides us.
In the Spirit of Phil Africa —
let us remember,
Freedom Is A Constant Struggle!
Jaan Laaman – Jan. 27, 2015″

Women in New York State Prisons Face Solitary Confinement and Shackling While Pregnant or Sick

convict_girl_2_by_rotwang1979-d5akmxf

http://solitarywatch.com/2015/02/16/women-in-new-york-state-prisons-face-solitary-confinement-and-shackling-while-pregnant-or-sick/
February 16, 2015 by Victoria Law

What does solitary confinement have to do with reproductive justice? Quite a lot, says a new report about reproductive health care in New York’s women’s prisons. The Correctional Association of New York, a criminal justice policy and advocacy organization, released Reproductive Injustice: The State of Reproductive Health Care for Women in New York State Prisons. The report is a culmination of the organization’s five-year study of the state’s women’s prisons, including in-person interviews with over 950 incarcerated women and 1,500 mailed-in surveys.

New York State incarcerates nearly 4,000 women each year. On any given day, the New York Department of Corrections and Community Service (DOCCS) imprisons 2,300 women, for which it is responsible for providing health care, including reproductive health care. But that care is “woefully substandard,” charges the report. The Correctional Association found that DOCCS systemically offered substandard medical treatment, inadequate access to gynecological care, poor conditions for pregnant women, and insufficient supplies of feminine hygiene products and toilet paper. In addition, pregnant women are routinely shackled during labor, delivery, and postpartum recovery, in violation of the state’s 2009 law.

Solitary confinement exacerbates these problems. Approximately 1,600 people are placed in solitary confinement in New York’s women’s prisons each year. On any given day, 100 women are held in solitary confinement. Until recently, no exceptions were made for pregnant women. But even women who are not pregnant have found that solitary confinement further obstructs their ability to access reproductive health care. “Solitary is especially dangerous for pregnant women because it impedes access to critical OB care and prevents women from getting the regular exercise and movement that are vital for a healthy pregnancy,” the report states. In addition, many pregnant women already experience stress and depression, feelings intensified by isolation. For pregnant women, the additional stress of being locked in a cell for 23 hours a day lowers their ability to fight infection and increases the risk of preterm labor, miscarriage, and low birth weight in babies.

Among the women surveyed by the Correctional Association, the three most common charges for isolation were, in order, disobeying a direct order, creating a disturbance, and being out of place. “It’s one of the clearest examples of how the prison system is a system of punishment and only uses punishment to address behaviors that need intervention and support,” Tamar Kraft-Stolar, director of the Correctional Association’s Women in Prison Project and the author of the report, told Solitary Watch.

DOCCS has two forms of solitary confinement—the Special Housing Unit (SHU), which is used to punish more serious rules violations, and keeplock, for less serious infractions. People placed in keeplock are usually confined to their own cells; if they live in a dorm setting, they are sent to a separate keeplock unit. SHU cells are in a separate area. In keeplock, individuals are allowed to keep their possessions while those in SHU are denied almost all of their property and receive only the minimal number of state-issued items. People generally spend no more than 60 days in keeplock, whereas people can spend months, years or even decades in the SHU.

Whether in SHU or keeplock, people are confined to their cells 23 hours each day. They cannot participate in programs, receive packages, or use the phone except to make legal or emergency calls. In addition, they are limited to one non-legal visit per week and three five to ten minute showers per week. They often have difficulty accessing doctors. When they are visited by medical staff, they are frequently forced to shout their concerns through a locked metal door, allowing people in neighboring cells and nearby staff to hear.

Until 2014, no written policy regulated pregnancy and solitary confinement. But as part of the settlement for the class-action lawsuit Peoples v Fischer, DOCCS issued a memo establishing a “presumption” against SHU placement for pregnant women unless a watch commander believes she poses “an immediate and substantial risk [to herself or others]…or an immediate and substantial threat to the safety and good order of the facility,” which remain left to the discretion of prison staff and officials. The memo does not restrict pregnant women from being placed in keeplock, instead suggesting it as an alternate placement for pregnant women who receive a SHU sentence.

The Correctional Association identified seven women held in solitary while pregnant between 2009 and 2012. All had problems accessing prenatal care from isolation. In one instance, a woman spent four weeks in keeplock where her complaints of bleeding were ignored. After the Correctional Association intervened, she was given medical attention and diagnosed with an ectopic pregnancy, in which the pregnancy occurs outside the womb and, if unaddressed, can be fatal.

“Elle Farah” was pregnant when she arrived at Albion Correctional Facility for a work release violation. The week before, she had visited the emergency room for what she had thought was a miscarriage. “They told me to wait and come back on Friday [two days later] for a sonogram and a D&C,” she told Solitary Watch. But work release rules dictated that she return to prison on Friday for the weekend and so she missed the appointment. When she was released on Sunday, she had a drink. “After that, I got sick. I was throwing up. I was throwing up on my way to parole [the next day],” she said. At the parole office, she failed her breathalyzer test and was sent to Albion. When her vomiting continued, she wondered whether she was miscarrying. When she told the sergeant that she was pregnant, she recalled that “he was really nasty about it. He said, ‘That’s not gonna get you out of SHU.’” The prison sent her to an outside hospital where she was told that she was having a miscarriage, that doctors could do nothing, and that she simply had to wait.

A prison nurse served as her hearing officer. At one point, Elle recalled, he stopped the recorder and told her that he had looked at her sonogram and, although she had been told that she was miscarrying, the baby looked fine. He then turned the recorder on and sentenced her to 90 days in SHU. She received no additional medical care or extra food. She was able to shower three times a week and exercise by herself in a small outdoor cage.

Because Albion has no facilities for pregnant women, Elle was transferred to Bedford Hills two weeks later. She was fully shackled, including waist chains, for the entire ten-hour bus ride. When she arrived at Bedford, she was placed in SHU. “Even though I was in solitary in both places, I was happy to go from one solitary to another because Bedford’s was a little bit better,” she said. But even with the extra snack that Bedford provides pregnant women (“usually a bologna sandwich,” she recalled, although pregnant women are advised to avoid deli meats which can be life-threatening to a fetus), she remembered that she was always hungry. “I had to wait a long time to eat and there wasn’t a lot of healthy food.”

Even women who are not pregnant face reproductive injustices while in isolation. Donna Hylton was in the SHU at Bedford Hills for three months when she sought care for a burning sensation in her urethra. First, she had to tell the officer that she wanted to sign up for sick call. “You have to yell your business down a corridor full of women,” she explained. Hours later, a male officer arrived and asked, “Who signed up for sick call? Why do you want to sign up for sick call?” The response, Hyton remembered, “felt like a gross violation of my privacy.”

Two days later, a nurse, accompanied by two officers, stopped in front of her cell and spoke to Hylton through the closed door. Two weeks after that, Hylton was placed in handcuffs, ankle cuffs and a waist chain before being escorted to the prison’s medical unit. There, a nurse asked if she had been having sex. “The door was open and a sergeant was right outside,” she remembered. “There was no privacy.” Another week passed before she was once again shackled and brought to the gynecologist, who asked the same question about sex. He did not examine her before prescribing Tylenol.

Finally, the woman in the adjoining cell, Judith Clark, helped Hylton figure out that she had a urinary tract infection triggered by antibiotics for a sinus infection. To access medical care, Hylton once again had to yell down the corridor to sign up for sick call and go through the whole process again. But this time, the gynecologist examined her. Although her waist chain and ankle cuffs were removed, she remained cuffed by one hand during the exam. “”You’re cuffed, you’re chained, you’re strapped. You have to take off some of your clothes while being restrained,” she explained. “Being a [rape] survivor, it was very violating. I was re-traumatized.”

Hylton was taken off the antibiotics for her sinus infection and placed on medication for a urinary tract infection. “But it was only because of Judy that I learned what was causing it,” she remembered. “No one had asked me anything about my medications.”

Hylton’s medical ordeal happened in 1987. Nearly 30 years later, the Correctional Association found that women face the same obstacles. Nearly half of the women surveyed attempted to access gynecological care while in isolation. More than one-third reported that the officers refused to place their names on the sick call list unless the woman described her concern. The practice has caused some women to refrain from seeking medical, particularly gynecological, care while in solitary. Given that the average SHU sentence is about three months and that the average keeplock sentence ranges between 14 and 27 days, not seeking health care can have deleterious, and sometimes long-lasting, effects.

In addition, some women have reported that nurses on sick call rounds dismissed their concerns and refused to allow them to see a doctor. Even when nurses are not dismissive, they must assess the woman through the closed cell door. Women also reported waiting for weeks before seeing a doctor. In the meantime, their symptoms often worsened. Like Hylton, women in the SHU are taken to gynecological appointments in shackles. DOCCS policy is to remove shackles for the appointment at the doctor’s request, but seven of the 25 women who had GYN exams while in isolation reported that they remained in restraints while being examined.

The Correctional Association also has a Prison Visiting Project, which visits and monitors conditions in both men’s and women’s prisons in New York State. Scott Paltrowitz, the project’s associate director, points out that many of these concerns, such as access and quality of medical care, are also experienced in men’s isolation units. “Solitary confinement is torture for all people because of the intense suffering and severe physical and psychological debilitation it causes,” he told Solitary Watch. “The particularly devastating gender-specific impacts on women in solitary highlighted in Reproductive Injustice epitomize the egregious nature of this practice and the extreme punitive approach utilized in New York State prisons. New York needs to end this practice for all people.”

Hylton agrees. “No one should be dehumanized in such a fashion.” So does Elle Farah. “Don’t put no pregnant person in SHU,” she recommended, adding, “I hope the whole solitary thing ends. The crime doesn’t justify the punishment.”

“These [stories] are examples of why we need to keep people out of solitary and keep people out of prison altogether,” said Tamar Kraft-Stolar. The report is the launching point for the Correctional Association’s Campaign to End Reproductive Injustice, which seeks to raise reproductive health care standards in prison, end shackling during all stages of pregnancy, and push New York to continue shifting away from incarceration by utilizing more alternatives to incarceration and ending the criminalization of social and economic issues.

Freedom Archives 522 Valencia Street San Francisco, CA 94110 415 863.9977 http://www.freedomarchives.org

free west papua a journal

westBy Herman Wainggai?

It is now 2015 and we begin the new year by continuing our decades old struggle for freedom and independence from Indonesia. For West Papuans, this is a struggle that began on 1 May, 1963 when the Indonesian Goverment first occupied our homeland, using military force to dominate our people. Fifty odd years later I find myself living a world away in Washington, D.C., seat of power of the influential United States Goverment. Since I arrived in what Americans call ?Our Nation?s Capitol?, I feel fortunate to have spent many hours with professors, students, government officials, non-government organisations, and friends, and their families discussing the situation in West Papua. I was surprised to learn that most Americans have no idea about the political situation in West Papua, how West Papuans have been deprived of our basic human rights for over five decades, or even West Papua?s geographical location.
To feel disheartened about this lack of international awareness of my people?s plight would be a natural response, however, I choose to look at this revelation as an important opportunity for our struggle. There is a gaping hole in the American people?s knowledge of my homeland and I intend to fill it with the truth of the West Papuan people?s story and their brutal mistreatment at the hands of the Indonesian Government. Bearing witness is one of my key reasons for escaping my homeland and living in exile.After fifty plus years of being silenced by Indonesia, West Papuans now have the opportunity, through me, to use our ?voice? to capture the attention of the American people, who I have found to be staunch supporters for ending human rights violations throughout the world. There is a strong belief amongst the people I have spoken to here in America that non-violent resistance is the most effective way for West Papua to achieve independence and that this strategy will open up significant opportunities to further bring our plight and struggle to the public?s attention.I begin this year with true West Papuan Christmas tales that will begin to shed light on what it is like to be an indigenous West Papuan under Indonesian rule.Experiencing this past Christmas in free America makes me reflect upon what Christmas means to some of us. Christmas is a time when people come together and experience joy and laughter. However, joy and laughter have been coupled with sorrow and tears in the long West Papuan struggle for independence.On 25 December 1989 I celebrated Christmas behind the bars of an Indonesian military prison, at that time not yet imprisoned myself. Under the ever watchful and intimidating gaze of six Indonesian prison guards I was allowed to visit my uncle, Dr Thomas Wainggai (a West Papuan independence leader at the time). Despite the circumstances, it is shared time with my uncle that I am grateful for, as some seven years later in 1996 he was killed at the will of the Indonesian Government while serving 20 years in jail because of his political beliefs. Political imprisonment, torture and extrajudicial killing are just part of the story of the West Papuan people and their struggle ? a harsh Christmas carol. I myself celebrated a few Christmases in prison as a guest of the Indonesian Government for my beliefs in Melanesian self-determination, human rights and human dignity. It was like a waking nightmare lived out in a dark room for months on end. I was denied access to a toilet, the cement floor was my bed, and I had a single shirt and pair of shorts for the duration of my stay. My books and writing materials were confiscated and never returned to me. It was the most inhumane experience I have had to endure in my life and it was done so with two guards vigilantly pointing their guns at me.A more positive Christmas story in my personal journey to West Papuan independence is set at sea. On 25 December 2005 I was with my comrades floating to freedom on a journey to Australia where I would be granted political asylum in recognition of the danger to my life in being returned to Indonesia. This Christmas at sea was a stepping stone on my path to the United States and my chance to speak for the people of West Papua and request the United Nations intervene on their behalf to help them peacefully resist occupation and end the genocide and human rights violations they have been subjected to.I look back on Christmases past with sorrow as well as joy, tears as well as laughter. But tonight I truly enjoy the full blessing of freedom here in Virginia. I miss West Papua and hope and pray we will be blessed with freedom someday. Then I will go back and enjoy that freedom with all those left behind.Source?http://hermanwainggai.com/wp/?p=624
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Support Pennsylvania Prisoner Whistleblowers

<
Action Alert!!! dallas 6 poster
Action Alert!!!
Stop the abuse and torture of prisoners!
Pack the court on Feb 17!
The Dallas 6 are six African-American
prisoners
in solitary confinement in SCI Dallas PA
prison who blew the whistle on & peacefully protest
ed
against abuse and violence by prison guards. Four
of
them face trial on Feb 17 in Luzerne County
(infamous for the “kids for cash” scandal) for “rio
ting.”
Donate now!
http://bit.ly/dallas6
Their jury trial will begin on February 17,
2015 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.
Why support the Dallas 6?
They are whistleblowers
who put their lives on the
line by taking action to stop the rampant abuse and
violence by guards at SCI Dallas and other PA
prisons.
We all depend on prisoners like the Dallas 6
to tell
the truth about our society and to defend all our c
ivil
and human rights.
They are part of a movement
of prisoners taking
action and speaking out through hunger and work
strikes such as in Georgia, Ohio, Alabama, Illinois
,
Indiana, Virginia and California.
Torture must remain illegal
in this country. Charles
Graner honed his torture skills in PA where he was
a
prison guard before moving on to Abu Ghraib. We
should not have to go to Iraq to find out what is
happening here, not when there are prisoners tellin
g it
like it is.
What can you do?

Fundraisers
in Pittsburgh Feb 13
http://fb1.us/7sd
and Philadelphia Feb 14
http://fb1.us/7se
.

Endorse the call
to support the Dallas 6.
http://goo.gl/forms/RrWyUi8td6

Help to pack the court on Feb 17. Sign up if
you are planning to come
, need or can offer
transportation/ housing.
http://bit.ly/1y13odb

Set up a speaking engagement for Shandre,
Derrick and Isaac
who give dynamic
presentations (see video below).

Sign the Petition
to Indict Corrupt Luzerne
County Officials.
http://bit.ly/dallas6-indict-petition

Help with housing, rides, food for those
coming to the trial.

Make a Donation!
http://bit.ly/dallas6
Your support is needed to insure that these men
receive a fair trial, that the abuses that they fac
ed in
prison do not continue, and, for the legal preceden
t
that this court case will establish.
If the Dallas 6 are justifiably cleared of all char
ges
Pennsylvania prisoners will be able to speak up
against abuse and torture without fear of retaliati
on.
Derrick Stanley
of the
Dallas 6 (at right) with
Shandre Delaney (left),
mother of Carrington
Keys of the Dallas 6 and
campaign coordinator
For more information
Video from Press Conference outside the
courtroom on Nov. 10
th

Community Forum featuring Shandre Delaney,
Derrick Stanley, and Isaac Sanchez

Shandre Delaney in Truthout:
Torture and
Retaliation Against Prisoner Whistleblowers
http://bit.ly/11QeSqk
Victoria Law in Solitary Watch,
On Trial for
Protesting Conditions in Solitary Confinement
http://bit.ly/11OL24x
Mumia Abu Jamal,
The Dallas Six
http://bit.ly/1HDaLy6
and earlier commentary
http://bit.ly/1tGaEfj
Shandre Delaney’s
Thursdays 9:30pm
blogtalkradio
http://bit.ly/1x5SXXe
Justice for the Dallas 6 Support Campaign:
for Lifers West; Germantown Friends Meeting Mass In
carceration Working Group; Global Women’s Strike &
Women of
Color@GWS – US; Human Rights Coalition

Mishkan Shalom New Jim Crow Study-
Action Group; Payday men’s network; Peacehome Campa
igns; Shalefield
Organizing Committee.
Endorsements:
Brandywine Peace Community; California Families Aga
inst Solitary Confin
The Center for Returning Citizens (TCRC); Decarcera
te PA; Defending Dissent Foundation; Global Women’s
Strike & Women of
Color@GWS –
UK; Human Rights Defense Center
(Prison) Bars –
Santa Cruz; T’ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rig
hts; WHAT’S UP?! Pittsburgh; Welfare Warriors; Wome
n’s
International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF)
Family and Friends of Mumia Abu-
Jamal; Patrice Armstead, Building People’s Power an
d Coalition Demanding Reinstatement of Dr.
Monteiro; Malik Aziz, Founder, Men United for a Bet
ter Philadelphia and Chairman, National Exhoodus Co
uncil; Pastor Antoinett
Jo
hnson, King Solomon Baptist Church; Dr. Anthony Mon
teiro; Rev. Bob Moore, Executive Director, Coalitio
n for Peace Action (for
purposes only); Dr. Heather Ann Thompson, Professor
of African American Studies & History, Temple Univ
ersity; Dr. Cornel West
Princeton University; Dr. Carla Willard, Africana S
tudies Program, Franklin & Marshall College.
Phone: 412-403-6101
Email:
Background
Six African-
American prisoners from the State Correctional Inst
itute (SCI) in Dallas, PA are facing charges of “ri
oting” for
blowing the whistle on the abuse of prisoners i
On April 10, 2010, illegal and barbaric conditions
at the hands of prison guards at SCI Dallas led the
se inmates, held in
solitary confinement, to stage a protest. For over
a year they had suffered food deprivation, destruct
ion of
neglect of medical conditions, use of a torture cha
ir and the deaths of some other prisoners
of an older white prisoner with mental health issue
s.
Aft
er guards kept prisoner Isaac Sanchez confined in a
torture chair overnight, six protested by covering
their cell door
windows with their bedding. The prisoners demanded
that the abuse stop, and requested access to their
counselors, state
police, the Distr
ict Attorney and the Public Defenders’ Office. They
had no access to telephones or computers and their
incoming and out-
going mail were being destroyed to undermine their
ability to expose the corruption.
Prison guards responded with an armed assault again
st the unarmed men locked inside individual cells.
They attacked the
six men with electroshock shields, tasers, fists an
d pepper spray.
The guards invo
lved suffered no injuries and initially no charges
were filed against the Dallas 6, who were left bloo
died,
naked, burnt and in pain. Although some of the men
were transferred to other prisons, they were able t
o file complaints
and initiate civil actions a
gainst the prison guards and officials involved.
Prison officials, state police and the Luzerne Coun
ty DA retaliated four months later by charging the
Dallas 6 with rioting.
The Dallas 6 believe that they are facing these tru
mped up charges because they c
Human Rights Coalition Report 1
, and, then subsequently stood up for their lives,
which is documented in
Retaliation, Report 2
.
Video from Press Conference outside the

Community Forum featuring Shandre Delaney,
Torture and
Retaliation Against Prisoner Whistleblowers
On Trial for
Protesting Conditions in Solitary Confinement
and earlier commentary
Thursdays 9:30pm
Solitary confinement is torture
Méndez, UN Special Rappateur on Torture, who has
called for an absolute ban on solitary for longer t
han
15 days.
Mass incarceration has meant many
inside for non-
violent offenses
convictions, immigration and parole viola
paying fines, or are innocent of any offense. But
whatever the offense,
the sentence does not include
torture.
Their trial is taking place in
the infamous Luzerne
‘Kids for Cash’ County
where judges were convicted
of kickbacks for incarcerati
ng children. Legal help is
needed to navigate those dirty waters.
Abolitionist Law Center; Every Mother is a Working
Mother Network; Fight
for Lifers West; Germantown Friends Meeting Mass In
carceration Working Group; Global Women’s Strike &
Women of

Fed Up; Human Rights Coalition –
Philadelphia; Marcellus Shale Earth First;
Action Group; Payday men’s network; Peacehome Campa
igns; Shalefield
Brandywine Peace Community; California Families Aga
inst Solitary Confin
The Center for Returning Citizens (TCRC); Decarcera
te PA; Defending Dissent Foundation; Global Women’s
Strike & Women of
UK; Human Rights Defense Center
– Lake Worth, Florida; Jewish Voice For Peace –
Philadelphia; Sin Barras
Santa Cruz; T’ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rig
hts; WHAT’S UP?! Pittsburgh; Welfare Warriors; Wome
n’s
International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF)
– Philadelphia.
Individual Endorsements
: Pam Africa, International Concerned
Jamal; Patrice Armstead, Building People’s Power an
d Coalition Demanding Reinstatement of Dr.
Monteiro; Malik Aziz, Founder, Men United for a Bet
ter Philadelphia and Chairman, National Exhoodus Co
uncil; Pastor Antoinett
hnson, King Solomon Baptist Church; Dr. Anthony Mon
teiro; Rev. Bob Moore, Executive Director, Coalitio
n for Peace Action (for
purposes only); Dr. Heather Ann Thompson, Professor
of African American Studies & History, Temple Univ
ersity; Dr. Cornel West
Princeton University; Dr. Carla Willard, Africana S
tudies Program, Franklin & Marshall College.
Partnering
Email:
sd4hrc@gmail.com
Website:
scidallas6.blogspot.com
American prisoners from the State Correctional Inst
itute (SCI) in Dallas, PA are facing charges of “ri
oting” for
blowing the whistle on the abuse of prisoners i
n solitary confinement.
On April 10, 2010, illegal and barbaric conditions
at the hands of prison guards at SCI Dallas led the
se inmates, held in
solitary confinement, to stage a protest. For over
a year they had suffered food deprivation, destruct
ion of
neglect of medical conditions, use of a torture cha
ir and the deaths of some other prisoners
, including the coerced suicide
of an older white prisoner with mental health issue
s.
er guards kept prisoner Isaac Sanchez confined in a
torture chair overnight, six protested by covering
their cell door
windows with their bedding. The prisoners demanded
that the abuse stop, and requested access to their
counselors, state
ict Attorney and the Public Defenders’ Office. They
had no access to telephones or computers and their
going mail were being destroyed to undermine their
ability to expose the corruption.
Prison guards responded with an armed assault again
st the unarmed men locked inside individual cells.
They attacked the
six men with electroshock shields, tasers, fists an
d pepper spray.
lved suffered no injuries and initially no charges
were filed against the Dallas 6, who were left bloo
died,
naked, burnt and in pain. Although some of the men
were transferred to other prisons, they were able t
o file complaints
gainst the prison guards and officials involved.
Prison officials, state police and the Luzerne Coun
ty DA retaliated four months later by charging the
Dallas 6 with rioting.
The Dallas 6 believe that they are facing these tru
mped up charges because they c
ontributed to
, and, then subsequently stood up for their lives,
which is documented in
Solitary confinement is torture
according to Juan
Méndez, UN Special Rappateur on Torture, who has
called for an absolute ban on solitary for longer t
han
Mass incarceration has meant many
prisoners are
violent offenses
such as minor drug
convictions, immigration and parole viola
tions & not
paying fines, or are innocent of any offense. But
the sentence does not include
the infamous Luzerne
where judges were convicted
ng children. Legal help is
needed to navigate those dirty waters.
Abolitionist Law Center; Every Mother is a Working
Mother Network; Fight
for Lifers West; Germantown Friends Meeting Mass In
carceration Working Group; Global Women’s Strike &
Women of
Philadelphia; Marcellus Shale Earth First;
Action Group; Payday men’s network; Peacehome Campa
igns; Shalefield
Brandywine Peace Community; California Families Aga
inst Solitary Confin
ement (CFASC);
The Center for Returning Citizens (TCRC); Decarcera
te PA; Defending Dissent Foundation; Global Women’s
Strike & Women of
Philadelphia; Sin Barras
– Without
Santa Cruz; T’ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rig
hts; WHAT’S UP?! Pittsburgh; Welfare Warriors; Wome
n’s
: Pam Africa, International Concerned
Jamal; Patrice Armstead, Building People’s Power an
d Coalition Demanding Reinstatement of Dr.
Monteiro; Malik Aziz, Founder, Men United for a Bet
ter Philadelphia and Chairman, National Exhoodus Co
uncil; Pastor Antoinett
e
hnson, King Solomon Baptist Church; Dr. Anthony Mon
teiro; Rev. Bob Moore, Executive Director, Coalitio
n for Peace Action (for
id
purposes only); Dr. Heather Ann Thompson, Professor
of African American Studies & History, Temple Univ
ersity; Dr. Cornel West
,
Partnering
with:
AFSC Prison Watch.
scidallas6.blogspot.com
American prisoners from the State Correctional Inst
itute (SCI) in Dallas, PA are facing charges of “ri
oting” for
On April 10, 2010, illegal and barbaric conditions
at the hands of prison guards at SCI Dallas led the
se inmates, held in
solitary confinement, to stage a protest. For over
a year they had suffered food deprivation, destruct
ion of
mail, beatings,
, including the coerced suicide
er guards kept prisoner Isaac Sanchez confined in a
torture chair overnight, six protested by covering
their cell door
windows with their bedding. The prisoners demanded
that the abuse stop, and requested access to their
counselors, state
ict Attorney and the Public Defenders’ Office. They
had no access to telephones or computers and their
going mail were being destroyed to undermine their
ability to expose the corruption.
Prison guards responded with an armed assault again
st the unarmed men locked inside individual cells.
They attacked the
lved suffered no injuries and initially no charges
were filed against the Dallas 6, who were left bloo
died,
naked, burnt and in pain. Although some of the men
were transferred to other prisons, they were able t
o file complaints
Prison officials, state police and the Luzerne Coun
ty DA retaliated four months later by charging the
Dallas 6 with rioting.
ontributed to
Institutionalized Cruelty,
, and, then subsequently stood up for their lives,
which is documented in
Resistance &